Kim Victoria Kettler began her studies under Stanley Tasker at Washington University and earned a BFA, Summa Cum Laude, at the University of Dayton. She continued her diverse art education at Antioch College, at International Papermaking Conferences in Boston and Japan, at the Brookfield Craft Center in Connecticut and at Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill where she worked with Sal del Deo, Jim Peters and Joyce Johnson, and most recently at Pratt Institute in New York City.

She has taught at Castle Hill, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, the International School in Istanbul, Turkey, the American Museum of Papermaking in Atlanta, Truro Central School and Provincetown Public Schools.

She has shown for 30 years in galleries from California to Cape Cod, the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, the Fine Arts Work Center, the American Museum of Papermaking, Atlanta, GA and at the Philadelphia Museum of Art as well as in Europe.

Kettler has shown at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, the Fine Arts Work Center, the American Museum of Papermaking, Atlanta, GA, the Philadelphia Museum of Art as well as in Germany.
 
Kim’s work is in many prestigious collections including:

Bank of Boston, Boston, MA
Children’s Hospital, Philadelphia, PA
First Atlanta Bank, Atlanta, GA
Marui Corporation, LTD., Tokyo, Japan
Saks Fifth Avenue, New York, NY
Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, MD
National Foundation for Children, Miami, FL.
University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI
 
Artist's Statement

I find oysters and their habitat an endless source of inspiration. Shellfish, with their hard, impenetrable shell and soft, vulnerable flesh are abstracts as well as real life objects which bring to mind the fragrant pleasures of a beautiful place. Metaphors and mythology infuse this Wellfleet symbol with a richness like no other. Like finding precious pearls encased in lowly bottom-dwellers, it is possible to imagine extracting pearls of wisdom from otherwise messy situations. Not to forget, the promise of love inflamed by the aphrodisiacal powers of legendary oysters cannot be lightly dismissed. And so I pay homage to creatures of beauty, of inspiration, and of sustenance.

"Full disclosure: my appreciation for the glorious oyster approaches religion to me. The eco-system in which they grow, the people who cultivate and harvest, and the creatures themselves are sacred parts of a sublime beauty. This is a blessing meant to be shared. Hallelujah."

"The bounty of our surrounding waters can sometimes be found at open air markets, like the Truro Ag Fair, which happens on the last Sunday of the summer. There I found my Holy Grail: freshly harvested oysters alongside some glorious fish. Since I live and breathe a coastal life, to me these are both objects of beauty and of sustenance."