Outermost Inspirations



Paul Batch

Rising | oil on canvas | 30 x 30, framed 36 x 36 | $6,500
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“The adventure of the sun is the great natural drama by which we live…not to share in it, is to close a dull door on nature’s sustaining and poetic spirit.” — Henry Beston

From the artist

“I was drawn to Beston’s words about the drama that which the sun can provide. This piece was created after a majestic sunset over the the salt marshes off of Town Neck Beach. As the sun set it’s light was shimmering through the atmosphere. It was both a joy to behold as well as to recreate through paint on canvas.”

— Paul Batch

Going Home | oil | 18 x 24, framed 24 x 30 | $3,900
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“…the adventure of the sun is the great natural drama by which we live, and not to have joy in it and awe of it, not to share in it, is to close a dull door on nature's sustaining and poetic spirit”

— Henry Beston

 
From the artist

“I was drawn to Beston’s words about the sun and it’s beauty. An evening off the beaten path not far from the center of Orleans provided a wonderful setting for the sun in all its’ glory. As Beston did before me, I sat in awe of its’ beauty. The warmth, the movement in the sky, the changing colors, it was all there. This is my humble attempt to share that moment.” — Paul Batch

Sundown, Chatham | oil | 18 x 36, framed 24 x 42 | $6,000
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“For the gifts of life are the earth’s and they are given to all, and they are the songs of birds at daybreak...and the dawn seen over the ocean from the beach.” — Henry Beston

From the artist

“I was drawn to the visual Beston created about the birds at day break and the dawn being seen over the ocean. The setting for this piece presented itself while walking along Chatham beach with my son. The painting is my humble attempt to recreate a beautiful gift that I was given, and one that I feel was similar to the one that Beston so eloquently described.” — Paul Batch


David Burns

Sand and Sea | watercolor | 13.5 x 21 | $1,200
Inspiration from The Outermost House

"One can see the quiet of the Bay — the subdued easterly wind blowing across the fields, the belt of winter weeds, the glint and warmth of the sun; there is a sense of old time dead and a new time beginning.” — Henry Beston

 
From the artist

"Purveying the coastal Cape, with so many variations of light as the clouds race over the dunes; to begin a painting, letting my eye value the many subjects that the sand and sea have settled on. Art is a new beginning.” — David Burns


Maryalice Eizenberg

Salt Pond Sanctuary | oil | 11 x 15, framed 12.75 x 15.75 | $850
Inspiration from The Outermost House

"Touch the earth, love the earth, honor the earth, her plains, her valleys, her hills, and her seas; rest your spirit in her solitary places.” — Henry Beston

From the artist
“As a child, I spent hours in the forests, around the lakes and by the sea with my parents who taught me the value of looking and listening in a quiet place. This silent appreciation crept into my soul and is a large part of who I am. When I read Beston’s nature passages, I recall the gift they gave me.”
 — Maryalice Eizenberg
Outer Beach Twilight | oil | 24 x 30, framed 25.5 x 31.5 | $1,500
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“Learn to reverence night and to put away the vulgar fear of it, for with the banishment of night from the experience of man, there vanishes as well a religious emotion, a poetic mood, which gives depth to the adventure of humanity.”  — Henry Beston  

From the artist

"Visiting nature after dark adds a dimension to the experience. The setting sun brings a quiet to places that we have already thought silent.” — Maryalice Eizenberg

 
 
Sylvan Twilight | oil | 24 x 18, framed 25.5 x 19.5 | $1,100
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“When all has been said, the adventure of the sun is the great natural drama by which we live, and not to have joy in it and awe of it, not to share in it, is to close a dull door on nature's sustaining and poetic spirit.”

― Henry Beston

From the artist

“I have long found joy in the golden hour before the sun sets. The colors in the sky and in those touched by the sun as it descends are compelling, the twining branches of dark trees create lace through which the lit sky shines.”  — Maryalice Eizenberg

The Only Constant is Change | oil | 24 x 36, framed 25.5 x 37.5 | $1,800
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“The three great elemental sounds in nature are the sound of rain, the sound of wind in a primeval wood, and the sound of outer ocean on a beach. I have heard them all, and of the three elemental voices, that of ocean is the most awesome, beautiful and varied.” — Henry Beston

From the artist

“The wind and the rain have a profound effect on our landscape particularly evident on our coastline following a powerful storm. I was struck by the changes at the Monomoy Wildlife Refuge and compelled to paint the bank because of the way the sun was striking its face. It will be different the next time I visit.”

— Maryalice Eizenberg


Catherine Hess

Path to the Bay | oil on wood panel | 11 x 11 | $400
Inspiration from The Outermost House

"The grass grows thickest on the slopes and shoulders of the mounds...." — Henry Beston

 

 
From the artist

"Dunes with their grasses that reflect light and harbor deep shadows are one of my favorite things to paint. I have done a number on the outer Cape, and have many more to do before I could ever, if ever, grow tired of them." — Catherine Hess


Marc Kundmann

Gift of the Tide | encaustic and charcoal on birch | 24 x 30 | $2,950
Inspiration from The Outermost House
"Do no dishonor to the earth lest you dishonor the spirit of man.... Touch the earth, love the earth, her plains, her valleys, her hills, and her seas; rest your spirit in her solitary places. For the gifts of life are the earth’s and they are given to all, and they are the songs of birds at daybreak, Orion and the Bear, and the dawn seen over the ocean from the beach.” — Henry Beston
 
From the artist
"I walk Longnook Beach with my partner and dog every day. Sun, rain, snow, wind. Each day is a surprise. The beach, sky, and water ever changing. Natural wonders I try not to take for granted.”
— Marc Kundmann
Peanut Bunker | encaustic, oil, and conte | 12 x 12 | $1,250
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals... They are not our brethren; they are not underlings; they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life…”  — Henry Beston

 
From the artist

“One morning this past summer, on my usual walk on Truro’s Longnook Beach, I witnessed masses of small fish washing up on to the beach. They looked beautiful, alive, flipping and sparkling in the sunlight at the water’s edge. They would all certainly die. I was compelled to try to save as many as I could, pushing them back in the water, a futile endeavor. What would make them do this? Their vast number was overwhelming and baffling. Their actions seemed pointless. I learned that the locals have a name for them—peanut bunkers. This wasn’t unusual and, in fact, a normal cycle. The small fish were being driven in by feeding mackerel, they in turn by larger fish behind them. A simple, though to my mind incomplete, explanation.”—Marc Kundmann

 

Sharon McGauley

Outer Beach | oil on canvas | 36 x 24, framed 38 x 26 | $4,900
Inspiration from The Outermost House
“I first read The Outermost House when I was a new visitor to Cape Cod and didn’t yet have my own relationship with the place. The book had a big influence on me, as books do when they articulate something you can sense but haven’t yet been able to put into words. Since that time I have had a deeper relationship with the place, but not, of course, with the intensity that Beston experienced. The allure of the Cape is that the natural wilderness that Beston writes about still feels accessible to those of us who, by comparison, are mere dabblers in wilderness immersion. In a place that is so popular, I still find it possible to intensely feel the sense of being lost in the landscape. Of being a tiny human in a vast and wild place. For that I am grateful to feel, and my paintings exist to express.” — Sharon McGauley
 
 
From the artist
“I first read The Outermost House when I was a new visitor to Cape Cod and didn’t yet have my own relationship with the place. The book had a big influence on me, as books do when they articulate something you can sense but haven’t yet been able to put into words. Since that time I have had a deeper relationship with the place, but not, of course, with the intensity that Beston experienced. The allure of the Cape is that the natural wilderness that Beston writes about still feels accessible to those of us who, by comparison, are mere dabblers in wilderness immersion. In a place that is so popular, I still find it possible to intensely feel the sense of being lost in the landscape. Of being a tiny human in a vast and wild place. For that I am grateful to feel, and my paintings exist to express.” — Sharon McGauley
Blues | oil on board 18 x 24, framed 20 x 26 | $3,600
Inspiration from The Outermost House
"Our fantastic civilization has fallen out of touch with many aspects of nature, and with none more completely than with night….With lights and ever more lights, we drive the holiness and beauty of night back to the forests and the sea.” — Henry Beston
 
 
From the artist

"The truth of this observation is simple and true. I always go to the sea to feel closer to nature, and going at night is even better. It gives me the feeling of being on a ship, of being alone in a big universe, in a way that is increasingly hard to find.” — Sharon McGauley


Jonathan McPhillips

The Scenic Route | oil | 18 x 24, framed 24 x 30 | $3,250
Inspiration from The Outermost House
"Desolate and half desert as it is, this borderland of the Cape has an extraordinary beauty, and for me the double attraction of mystery and wide horizons” — Henry Beston
 
From the artist
"I am drawn to the mystery of these camouflaged roads at the National Seashore. Paved with sand and history, the twisting and meandering paths are one of the few indications of human presence in the dunes. It is as if the dunes barely tolerate their existence, and would make them unrecognizable if left unused for too long.” — Jonathan McPhillips
Dune View | oil | 9 x 12, framed 15 x 18 | $950
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“Walking the beach close in along these steeps, one walks in the afternoon shade of a kind of sand enscarpment, now seven or eight feet high...now fifteen or twenty feet high.” — Henry Beston

From the artist

“One of my favorite little pleasures is coming around or over a dune for the first time at a beach entrance.”

“The walls of sand keep the beach a mystery, and enhance the anticipation when approaching from the long, soft paths.” — Jonathan McPhillips

 

 

John Murphy

Signed and Saved | oil | 24 x 30, framed 31.5 x 37.5 | $2,800
Inspiration from The Outermost House

"Today, 90 years after the book was first published, Beston is widely acknowledged as the spiritual father of the park. When the outer beaches of Cape Cod were under consideration for National Park status in the 1950s, the Department of the Interior sent representatives to evaluate the area. Quotations from The Outermost House were cited in their reports.

The Cape Cod National Seashore has drawn millions of visitors since it was first established by a decree from President John F. Kennedy in 1961. One of the great influences on the park’s establishment was the Cape Cod nature classic, The Outermost House, by Henry Beston.” — Don Wilding

 
 

Susan Overstreet

Magic Moment High Head | oil on board | 12 x 16 | $800
Inspiration from The Outermost House
“A human life, so often likened to a spectacle upon a stage, is more justly a ritual. The ancient values of dignity, beauty and poetry which sustain it are of Nature’s inspiration; they are born of the mystery and beauty of the world.” — Henry Beston
 
From the artist
"The practice and honing of my craft is a ritual sustained by the inspiration of nature. Capturing the emotional response from viewing the ever-changing beauty before me is often a challenge, but always a joy. With each painting, I record my reverence for nature.” — Susan Overstreet
House Above Pamet | acrylic on canvas | 24 x 18 | $1,000
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“Whatever attitude to human existence you fashion for yourself, know that it is valid only if it be the shadow of an attitude to Nature.” — Henry Beston

 
From the artist
“There are many weather-beaten structures in remote corners of Cape Cod that inspire me. This simple house in Truro stands strong yet humble against weather and time, and seems a part of the natural environment, as though the forces of nature made it their own. Nature has given the house a particular beauty and it is as though the house is grateful.” — Susan Overstreet

Andrea Petitto

Oystermen's Evening Feast | oil | 24 x 24 | $2,700
Inspiration from The Outermost House
"I often cook myself a camp supper on the beach. Beyond the crackling, salt-yellow driftwood flame, over the pyramid of barrel staves, broken boards, and old sticks all atwist with climbing fire, the unseen ocean thunders and booms, the breaker sounding hollow as it falls.” — Henry Beston
 
From the artist
"When I attended this oyster roast one evening in January in Chatham, I was reminded of the many times my husband and I gathered with friends on the beach. We would stop at a local fish market and buy fish fresh from the sea, make a fire and grill them. There is a special camaraderie among people who are gathered around a fire at night. The warmth of the fire draws us in, while a semipermeable wall of darkness is created beyond the reach of its light, holding us in together. These thoughts formed the emotional basis for this painting. The contrast of light and dark, and of the warm fire light and the cool flashlight beam create a dramatic visual tension. The darkening sky behind a tangle of branches provides a cooler, more distant echo of the shapes of the chaotic flames." — Andrea Petitto
Life on the Edge | oil | 24 x 28, framed 27 x 31 | $2,850
Inspiration from The Outermost House

"The ancient values of dignity, beauty, and poetry which sustain it are of Nature’s inspiration; they are born of the mystery and beauty of the world. Do no dishonour to the earth lest you dishonour the spirit of man. Hold your hands out over the earth as over a flame. To all who love her, who open to her the doors of their veins, she gives of her strength, sustaining them with her own measureless tremor of dark life. Touch the earth, love the earth, honour the earth, her plains, her valleys, her hills, and her seas; rest your spirit in her solitary places.” — Henry Beston

From the artist

“I have always loved to walk through the great dunes of the Outer Cape. The dunes roll away into the distance having been sculpted by the persistent winds endlessly removing and depositing sand creating shapes that mimic the waves of the nearby ocean. Life is scarce on these dunes and what there is eke’s a precarious living from the dry sand. Beach plums have enormously long taproots which draw water up from the the 'moist core of the sands'. These things speak to us of the persistence of life against all odds.” — Andrea Petitto

 

Walking the Beach | oil | 16 x 12, framed 17.5 x 13.5 | $950
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“In my world of beach and dune these elemental presences lived and had their being, and under their arch there moved an incomparable pageant of nature and the year. The flux and reflux of ocean, the incomings of waves, the gatherings of birds, the pilgrimages of the peoples of the sea, winter and storm, the splendour of autumn and the holiness of spring—all these were part of the great beach.” — Henry Beston

From the artist

“As a year round Cape Cod resident, I also walk the beaches through all the seasons and all the moods of the fickle New England weather. This painting reminds me of many times I’ve been on the beach ahead of or after a storm. The light is low and rich and the contrast between the clear blue sky and the encroaching clouds is dramatic. An on-shore breeze provides a tactile connection to movements of the ocean. This woman might be heading home before a storm or she might be heading out after a storm to see what changes might have occurred.”

— Andrea Petitto


Amy Sanders

Clearing | pastel | 9 x 12, framed 13 x 16 | $1,175
Inspiration from The Outermost House
“…the undulations and levels of whose rim now stand a hundred, now a hundred and fifty feet above the tides, worn by the breakers and the rains, disintegrated by the wind, it still stands bold.”
— Henry Beston
 
 From the artist
“Winter storms often clear later in the day on the Outer Cape than they do on the mainland. This storm began to break around 4:00 pm, allowing a beam of late afternoon sunshine to cut through Brush Hollow and spill across the otherwise cold sand, with the shadowed face of what Truro folks call ‘High Dune’ standing tall beyond.” — Amy Sanders
Fort Hill Revisited | pastel | 14 x 24, framed 18 x 28 | $2,900
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“Outermost cliff and solitary dune, the plain of ocean and the far, bright rims of the world, meadow land and marsh and ancient moor: this is Eastham; this is the outer Cape. Sun and moon rise here from the sea, the arched sky has an ocean vastness, the clouds are now of ocean, now of earth. Having known and loved this land for many years, it came about that I found myself free to visit there, and so I built myself a house upon the beach.”

— Henry Beston

 
From the artist

“I awoke one morning to see some tremendous billowing clouds scuttling along in the pre-dawn twilight through my window. I remained peripherally aware of them while I prepared for the day. A bit later while traveling, the clouds began to light up with the rising sun still below the horizon. I veered off Route 6 to the Fort Hill overlook just as the first rays of sun pierced through to set the hills there ablaze. The scene burned a permanent impression of breathtaking beauty in my mind.” — Amy Sanders

Accumulated Drift of Stones | pastel | 9 x 12, framed 13 x 16 | $1,450
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“Moving down into the sea, later glaciations passed over the old beaches and the fragments of the plain, and, stumbling over them, heaped upon these sills their accumulated drift of gravels, sand, and stones.” — Henry Beston

 

From the artist

“It is a sunny but cold day on Nauset Beach in Orleans. The recent storms have taken much of the beach away, to the point where old peat flats have surfaced from under the sand. Huddled along the edge of one of those flats, was this accumulation of stones and pebbles, whose last time in the light of day might have been over a hundred years ago. Washed in water, their brilliant colors and reflections of the day’s bright sun was captivating.”

— Amy Sanders

 

Afternoon Curl | pastel | 12 x 12, framed 12 x 16 | $1,500
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“The dominant note is the great spilling crash made by each arriving wave. It may be hollow and booming, it may be heavy and churning, it may be a tumbling roar. The second fundamental sound is the wild seething cataract roar of the wave’s dissolution and the rush of its foaming waters up the beach—this second sound diminuendo. The third fundamental sound is the endless dissolving hiss of the inmost slides of foam.”— Henry Beston

 From the artist

“Around 3:00 on a bright and clear winter afternoon I took a walk along the outer beach. The sun was just about to set behind the high dunes, resulting in light striking almost directly on the front of the perfectly formed curl of a wave. There was an intriguing shadow tucked under the curl, and the foreground water was already in the shade creating a unique lighting that just begged to be painted.” — Amy Sanders


Paul Schulenburg

Walking the Beach | oil on canvas | 30 x 42 | $6,100
Inspiration from The Outermost House
“The longer I stayed, the more eager I was to know this coast and to share its mysterious and elemental life; I found myself free to do so, I had no fear of being alone… presently I made my mind up to remain and try living for a year on Eastham beach.”
— Henry Beston
 
 From the artist
"The location in this painting is not far from what would have been the site of the 'Outermost House' that Henry Beston built in 1925. The sands have shifted much over the years and the beach is constantly changing. Nothing remains of Beston’s house, but the sand, waves and coastline remain much the way they were in his time. Beston would occasionally walk down to visit with the men at the Coast Guard station. That same station building is seen in this piece, as is a figure of a man who is making his way north along the beach.” — Paul Schulenburg
Coast Guard Beach, Looking South | oil | 9 x 12 | $1,000
Inspiration from The Outermost House
“At the ocean’s very edge the air is almost always cool-cold even-and delicately moist with surface spray and the endless dissolution of the innumerable bubbles of the foam slides; the wet sand slope beneath exhales a cool savoire of mingling beach and sea, and the innermost breakers push ahead of them puffs of this fragrant air.” — Henry Beston
 
 From the artist
"Coast Guard beach can be full of people, but a short walk along the shore will bring you to a location of quiet and solitude.”
— Paul Schulenburg
Working on the Water | oil | 40 x 30 | $7,000
Inspiration from The Outermost House
“We lose a great deal, I think, when we lose this sense and feeling for the sun. When all has been said, the adventure of the sun is the great natural drama by which we live, and not to have joy in it and awe of it,” — Henry Beston
 From the artist

“Chatham’s outer beaches can be seen across the water from the Fish Pier. Commercial fishing boats navigate their way in and out of the harbor, bringing the catch of the day. I noticed a young woman working on one of the boats, unusual since most of the people working on the boats are men. She looked strong, confident, able and still very much a beautiful young woman. In this painting she stands inside the boat holding coiled line (or rope), in bright sunlight and partially in the shade of the boat’s roof. She reminded me of Botticelli’s painting 'The Birth Of Venus', in which an idealized figure of a woman stands over the ocean in a large scallop shell, her hair softly blowing in the breeze, modestly covering herself with her hair. To me this could be a modern version of Venus as a strong, working woman.” — Paul Schulenburg

 

Coast Guard Beach Station | oil | 16 x 20 | $2,900
Inspiration from The Outermost House

"5 o’clock in the afternoon, and I have arrived at Nauset station after a walk up the beach and a cold headwind… The 4:30 supper is drawing to a close but my neighbors are still at table, for I can hear voices and discussion at the board. Come in! I find my friends still at their long table in the kitchen’s farther end. Supper is just about over. Somebody went fishing yesterday, and on the table a great tureen, once full of good fish chowder, stands at dead low tide... Sit down and have a cup of coffee with us… Thanks I’d love to.” — Henry Beston

 
 From the artist

"The Eastham Coast Guard Station stands defiantly beside the rolling surf and the ever changing beach sand. The red roof, green shutters, white clapboard as well as steel girders and wood fencing contrast against the wide-open ocean front environment. In this painting I concentrated on the complexity of light and shadow in the architectural detail of the man-made environment onshore, with just a hint of the open ocean in the distance.” — Paul Schulenburg

 
Sunshine on the Harbor | oil | 24 x 30 | $5,200
Inspiration from The Outermost House

"5 o’clock in the afternoon, and I have arrived at Nauset station after a walk up the beach and a cold headwind… The 4:30 supper is drawing to a close but my neighbors are still at table, for I can hear voices and discussion at the board. Come in! I find my friends still at their long table in the kitchen’s farther end. Supper is just about over. Somebody went fishing yesterday, and on the table a great tureen, once full of good fish chowder, stands at dead low tide... Sit down and have a cup of coffee with us… Thanks I’d love to.” — Henry Beston

 
 From the artist

"The Eastham Coast Guard Station stands defiantly beside the rolling surf and the ever changing beach sand. The red roof, green shutters, white clapboard as well as steel girders and wood fencing contrast against the wide-open ocean front environment. In this painting I concentrated on the complexity of light and shadow in the architectural detail of the man-made environment onshore, with just a hint of the open ocean in the distance.” — Paul Schulenburg

 

Catherine Skowron

Another Day | oil | 30 X 40, framed 31 x 41 | $4,500
Inspiration from The Outermost House
“At dawn the sun rising out of the ocean gilds it with a level silence of light which thins and rises and vanishes into day. Solitary and elemental, unsullied and remote, visited and possessed by the outer sea, these sands might be the end or the beginning of a world.” — Henry Beston
 
From the Artist
"Beston beautifully expresses my feelings as I walk the outer beach just as the sun rises. The universe is spread out before me, there is the adventure of new discoveries, and everything seems hopeful at the beginning of another day.” — Catherine Skowron
Afternoon Light | oil | 12 x 24, framed 13 x 25 | $1,150
Inspiration from The Outermost House

“Touch the earth, love the earth, her plains, her valleys, her hills, and her seas; rest your spirit in her solitary places. For the gifts of life are the earth’s and they are given to all, and they are the songs of birds at daybreak, Orion and the Bear, and the dawn seen over the ocean from the beach.” — Henry Beston

 
From the Artist

“This is a view from the Chatham Fish Pier, looking across Tern Island, toward the lower end of the Nauset Beach. Not too many years ago there were several shacks out on this part of the outer beach, but most have either washed away or been removed. Just like Beston’s 'outermost house', all that remains are the memories.” 

“Clouds in the sky will create bright spots and shadowy areas on the water, and I loved the way the sun shown on the sailboat and outer beach while the foreground was in cooler shadow. The outermost beach looks like a bit of paradise just across the way. So close and yet so far.” — Paul Schulenburg